Buttermilk Pancakes

Our latest activity in our farm tours is making buttermilk pancakes! Learn the difference between fresh and cultured buttermilk and why buttermilk makes the fluffiest pancakes. As a fun activity, mix, measure, cook and flip your own pancakes…and eat them too!

This activity is an additional activity and only for farm tours, not field trips. Extra charge of P200/head and suitable for a small group of 5 to as large as 20. Each participant will have his chance to measure out and cook his own pancake, with as many flips and flourishes he wants.

 

Not-So-New Product Alert! Real Buttermilk!

Just a reminder……

Now available! Cultured #buttermilk! Thick and tangy, buttermilk’s acidity is used to create lighter cakes (its acidity reacts with baking soda) while giving it a delicious tang. It also is used in marinating chicken for the juicy and flavorful fried #chicken (a Southern specialty!). And of course, there are fluffy buttermilk #pancakes and #waffles! P350/L, P120/200ml. Watch out for pictures of our kitchen test.

Buttermilk Cake Donuts

Cake donuts are heavier and denser than regular bready donuts so don’t expect the same product as your favorite Krispy Kreme.

This recipe is from NYTimes by Alison Roman. See the recipe (and video) here.

INGREDIENTS

FOR THE DOUGHNUTS:

  • 4 cups/960 milliliters vegetable oil, for frying, plus 3 tablespoons
  • 2 ⅔ cups/339 grams all-purpose flour, plus more as needed
  • ½ cup/101 grams granulated sugar
  • 2 ¼ teaspoons baking powder
  • ¾ teaspoon kosher salt
  •  teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • ½ cup/113 grams sour cream
  • ½ cup/120 milliliters buttermilk
  • 1 large egg plus 1 large egg yolk

FOR THE VANILLA GLAZE:

  • 2 cups/204 grams confectioners’ sugar
  • ¼ cup/60 milliliters buttermilk, milk or water, plus more as needed
  • ¼ teaspoon vanilla extract
  •  teaspoon kosher salt
  •  Sprinkles, toasted coconut flakes or chopped nuts, such as pecans, pistachios or hazelnuts (we used almond flakes and pistachios)

FOR THE CHOCOLATE GLAZE:

  • 1 ½ cups/185 grams confectioners’ sugar
  • ½ cup/47 grams cocoa powder
  • ¼ cup/60 milliliters buttermilk, milk or water, plus more as needed
  •  teaspoon kosher salt
  •  Sprinkles, toasted coconut flakes, flaky salt or chopped nuts, such as pecans, pistachios or hazelnuts

PREPARATION

  1. Make the doughnuts: Heat 4 cups/960 milliliters of oil in a large heavy bottomed pot (preferably wider than taller) over medium heat to 375 degrees.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, baking powder, kosher salt and nutmeg.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk together sour cream, buttermilk, egg, egg yolk and 3 tablespoons oil. Add the wet ingredients to the dry, using a wooden spoon to gently mix just until a dough comes together (you want to keep it rather shaggy; do not overwork the dough).
  4. Transfer dough to a floured work surface and knead 4 or 5 times, just until no wet or dry spots remain, sprinkling in additional flour as necessary (dough should feel supple but not wet).
  5. Pat dough (no need to use a rolling pin here) to a thickness of about ¾-inch. Using a 3 1/8- to 3 1/4-inch ring cutter, punch out as many circles as you can. Using a 1 ¼-inch ring cutter, punch out the center of each circle. (Dipping the rings in flour before each cut helps to avoid sticking.) The scraps of dough can be gathered and gently pressed again two more times to cut the rest of the doughnuts, continuing to flour your work surface as needed.
  6. Working in batches, gently lower doughnuts into the oil (no more than 4 or 5 at a time). Fry on one side until deeply golden brown, about 2 minutes. Flip with tongs or a skimmer and continue to fry until golden brown and cooked through, another 2 minutes.
  7. Drain doughnuts on a wire rack lined with paper towels and proceed with remaining doughnuts, making sure the oil returns to temperature between batches.
  8. To make the vanilla glaze: In a medium bowl, whisk together powdered sugar, buttermilk, vanilla extract and salt until no lumps remain. Add additional buttermilk if necessary, 1 tablespoon at a time, to thin the glaze.
  9. Remove paper towel from wire rack. Dip each doughnut into the glaze on one side, letting excess drip back into the bowl, and return it to the wire rack. Sprinkle immediately with sprinkles, chopped nuts or toasted coconut.
  10. To make the chocolate glaze: In a medium bowl, whisk together powdered sugar, cocoa powder, buttermilk and salt until no lumps remain. Add additional buttermilk if necessary, 1 tablespoon at a time, to thin the glaze.
  11. Remove paper towel from wire rack. Dip each doughnut into the glaze on one side, letting excess drip back into the bowl, and return it to the wire rack. Sprinkle immediately with sprinkles, flaky sea salt, chopped nuts or toasted coconut.

Buttermilk Soap

 

A new way to use buttermilk!!! Who says dairy is only meant to be eaten? Cleopatra was reputed to have taken baths in milk.

So I saw this soap and got excited with the idea of this new product from our buttermilk! It’s soap, but it also sounds pretty yummy :):) Cant wait for her post :):) thanks so much. #Repost@sunnabodytreat with @get_repost ・・・ Working with this 😊 @pinkiesfarm buttermilk for a buttermilk bastille soap 😊 with chamomile infused evoo

Not to worry, we’re not getting into the beauty business. But we love the idea of dairy making you beautiful, inside and out. 🙂

Baking Tip!

For a tender and fine crumb, most bakers recommend using buttermilk. Its acidity reacts with baking soda to create a lighter cake while imparting a tanginess to add to the flavor.

We made this marbled cake using our buttermilk, but left out the icing. Bundt cakes, after all, are pretty enough to go without icing, and a simple dusting of confectioner’s sugar will suffice.

The result: a very soft and tender and MOIST cake, which remained delicious even after 4 days.

Recommendation: use UNSWEETENED chocolate for a more dramatic contrast. We used 74% dark chocolate and felt it could have used more bitterness.

For the recipe for this marbled bundt cake, click here.

Love Flakiness!

For effortless flakiness in biscuits, scones, and shortcakes, use REAL buttermilk! Of course, the basics of making biscuits and scones remain the same: use COLD (as in straight-out-of-the-freezer cold) ingredients, from butter cubes, dry ingredients (we stick ours in the freezer for a bit), and the buttermilk. The colder it is, the more the butter won’t melt and the flakier it becomes.

Buttermilk will make the biscuits tender and puffy (because of its reaction with the baking soda).

Here is a recipe for a versatile biscuit. Click here.